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Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Tomlinson’

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
December 19, 2016

 

It happened Tuesday evening . . .

A dozen TWS writers gathered at the Alicia Ashman Branch Library two weeks ago for cookies and critiques. Here’s who was up:

Pat Edwards (rough draft, chapter, What to Pack for a Hero’s Journey) – Pat submitted a very rough, transcription based chapter for her non-fiction book.  Most of the feedback was that it was too hard to read in the transcription format.  Once the purpose was explained, though, many people had good ideas for the book, including using more “real people” stories, references to myths, and deeper explanation of the monomyth (The Hero’s Journey).

Amber Boudreau (chapter 11, The Dragoneer) – John thought the beginning of the chapter (Chapter 11) needed a better hook. Kashmira thought the start of the second paragraph was a better hook. Cindy too felt the beginning was a bit out of order. John thought some stronger word choices would help one character’s dialogue and would like to see Moira pick up a bit more of her training instead of just be told about it. Tracey liked the humanizing elements used to describe the dragon.

John Schneller (chapter 7, Final Stronghold) – The increased action as compared to previous chapters was appreciated. A request for better descriptions of the dragon, especially the unique characteristics, was requested. Using chapters to separate scene changes instead of asterick denoted scene changes was discussed. My desire was to infer concurrent timelines, but I will consider this. A couple snaffoos were noted. A bear should never roar like a lion, and the colloquialism ‘pan out’ was identified. (more…)

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Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
March 18, 2016

 

“Have something to say, and say it as clearly as you can.  That is the only secret of style.” – Matthew Arnold, British Poet (1822 – 1888)

 

How to Sell More Books with Great Book Cover Design

March 11, 2016 by Joanna Penn

Investing in professional book cover design is non-negotiable for indie authors who want to make a living with their writing. Readers DO judge a book by its cover, and they won’t read your blurb, download a sample or buy now without connecting to your cover somehow.  In short, you’re unlikely to sell many books unless you have a great cover design.

In this article, JD Smith outlines her tips for book cover design. Her new book is The Importance of Book Cover Design and Formatting for Self-Published Authors. Jane is also my book cover designer and I highly recommend her.

There’s a constant debate about the relevance and importance of cover design, whether you’re a self-published author, part of a collective group of authors, an independent press, or even a large publishing house. If you are publishing your book to give away as Christmas presents, or you only expect a few members of your family to buy them, then the cover is as important as you consider it to be.

But if you are a professional writer and you intend to earn a living or be taken seriously in the literary world, then the book cover is as important as the copy editing, the proofreading, the story and the characters.

It is a part of your marketing … and it’s there to attract the right kind of readers. (more…)

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Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
March 4, 2016

 

“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” – William Wordsworth

Middle School Novelists

Richard Hamel is a Madison School teacher who sponsors a writing program for middle school students. Students across the district are writing novels through the NANOWRIMO (National Novel Writing Month) website (They wrote drafts last November, then revised through subsequent months). They will have a culminating workshop at the public library downtown in April to celebrate their accomplishment and to connect them to local writers. They are looking for writing volunteers for the workshop.

Are you interested?  You can contact Pat for Richard’s contact info.

 

A Place to Find Our Words: Bloggers and Their Writing Spaces

Man Booker Prize-winning novelist Yann Martel once described how “totally dull” the space he uses to write is: “It’s a table with a computer, that’s it,” he said. “I have little pieces of paper next to me that are my little notes, and that’s it. Otherwise, I could be an accountant for, you know, as far as my desk, you couldn’t tell that I’m a writer.” Like Martel, I prefer writing at a sparse desk so I can focus on the words in front of me. I was curious if others felt the same, so I asked five bloggers to take photos of their writing spaces and describe how they work in them.

Check out the full post and photos at https://discover.wordpress.com/2016/02/22/bloggers-and-writing-spaces/ (more…)

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Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
February 26, 2016

 

NY Times Haiku

http://haiku.nytimes.com/

By Jacob Harris

Whimsy is not a quality we usually associate with computer programs. We tend to think of software in terms of the function it fulfills. For example, a spreadsheet helps us do our work. A game of Tetris provides a means of procrastination. Social media reconnects us with our high school nemeses. But what about computer code that serves no inherent purpose in itself?

There is pleasure to

be had here, in flares of spice

that revive and warm.

This is a Tumblr blog of haikus found within The New York Times. Most of us first encountered haikus in a grade school, when we were taught that they are three-line poems with five syllables on the first line, seven on the second and five on the third. According to the Haiku Society of America, that is not an ironclad rule. A proper haiku should also contain a word that indicates the season, or “kigo,” as well as a juxtaposition of verbal imagery, known as “kireji.” That’s a lot harder to teach an algorithm, though, so we just count syllables like most amateur haiku aficionados do. (more…)

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Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
February 19, 2016

 

The first word . . .

Nonfiction author Matt Ziselman: “I did what many writers do at one time or another: I stopped writing. But, perhaps even worse than not writing was that I stopped believing that I could write.”

 

Middle School Novelists

Richard Hamel is a Madison School teacher who sponsors a writing program for middle school students. Students across the district are writing novels through the NANOWRIMO (National Novel Writing Month) website (They wrote drafts last November, then revised through subsequent months). They will have a culminating workshop at the public library downtown in April to celebrate their accomplishment and to connect them to local writers. They are looking for writing volunteers for the workshop.

Are you interested?  Contact me to get Richard’s contact info.

(more…)

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