Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Fifth Tuesday’

Writer’s Mail

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays With Story
September 21, 2018

Tuesday evening at B&N

Nine writers circled the chairs on the store’s bargain floor for an evening of ghost stories, lost memories, changing lives, magic, and cauterized wounds. Here is some of what was said in the critiques:

Meg Matenaer (chapter 3, Write in Time) After a lively garbage disposal discussion, the group decided that Marie should drop a thin juice glass into it instead of a thick coffee mug. Jack suggested the line, “The garbage disposal could be reset, but her day could not.” Amber, John, and Jerry noted that the readers know little about the professor. The group was alarmed about John’s (Rueger not Schneller) ear and thought he should be too.

Lisa McDougal (chapters 3-4, The Tebow Family Secret) . . .

Amber Boudreau (chapter 13 rewrite, The Dragoneer) Amber read from Chapter 13 of her novel The Dragoneer which she is deep in the middle of rewriting. John and Jerry enjoyed the piece but had suggestions on switching a few sentences around for clarity and deleting some mundane dialogue.

Mike Austin (short story, “Go Faster”)  I received a lot of really good comments and input for, “Go Faster.” I found that I need to start naming things. John wanted me to name roads and locations, Jerry wanted me to name the beer they’re drinking. There was a brief discussion about fingers tickling, “as light as spider’s feet.” In the end, I was allowed to keep it. Jerry thought I could say “humerus” instead of “arm bone.” Sounds kind of funny to me. Okay, bad pun. I was concerned that the humerus through his chest (Hm. Now I’m starting to like it.) might seem contrived, but was assured that it was not. Thank you, everyone, for the encouraging comments.

Jerry Peterson (short story, part 1 rewrite plus 6 new pages, “Death Rides the Rails”) . . . The scene of Early hunting a rabbit was not serious for Amber Boudreau but a comedy. “Could you add a few more animals?” she asked. John Schneller said a hawk would not attack a man, that another way has to be found to injure Early so the next scene—he cauterizing of his wounds—can be saved.

 

Who’s up next

October 2

Bob Kralapp (???)

Paul Wagner (???)

Larry Sommers (chapter, untitled novel)

Jack Freiburger (chapter, A Walk on the Water)

Cindi Dyke (???)

John Schneller (chapter, Final Stronghold)

Tracey Gemmell (chapters)

 

Fifth Tuesday

As, yes, October 30. And we now have a writing challenge. Here’s the prompt: “A howling good time.”

Your story, in no more than 500 words, doesn’t have to be a Halloween story, but it could be. Figure out where you’re going with the prompt and start writing!

 

Our editor

Tracey Gemmell loves editing our e-newsletter so much that on October 1 she moving back into the chair where she will shepherd the next two issues. Email your good stuff to her.

 

Why you need an inciting incident

From Randy Ingermanson who bills himself as America’s Mad Professor of Fiction Writing:

 

First, let’s define our terms. The inciting incident is some “new thing” in your protagonist’s world. It marks the change that is ultimately going to pull your protagonist into your story. Usually, this is something external to your protagonist, but it’s possible it could be an internal change.
I don’t see a problem with starting the inciting incident in the first two pages of your novel. You can put it pretty much anywhere you want, so long as it’s reasonably early in the story and as long as it works. Some stories start fast out of the gate, and some take longer to get rolling.
I do see a problem with a scene that has no conflict of any kind. Conflict doesn’t get in the way of your reader caring about your protagonist. Conflict is often the reason your reader does care, at least early on. When we see somebody in trouble, we instinctively care about them. We might later stop caring about them if we decide they aren’t worth caring about.
But let’s face it—when somebody’s in trouble, we care. The news concerning twelve young soccer players and their coach in Thailand trapped by rising floodwaters two and a half miles into a cave, made people care. The minute we heard about them, we cared. Because that’s what humans do.
Fiction is about giving your reader a powerful emotional experience whether it is external or internal, conflict is conflict.
Do all scenes require a Goal, Conflict, and Setback? The answer is no. That’s one strategy, and we call that strategy a Proactive Scene. But another strategy is the Reactive Scene, where you have a Reaction, a Dilemma, and a Decision. (For much more on both of those, see my latest book, How to Write a Dynamite Scene Using the Snowflake Method.)
I strongly recommend that all scenes be either Proactive or Reactive. These are solid design patterns that work well and that your readers are already primed to understand. If you have a scene that’s neither Proactive nor Reactive, you should be able to explain to yourself what makes the scene work—why is it giving your reader a powerful emotional experience? And then you should ask whether you can make the scene better by turning it into either a Proactive or Reactive scene. Because usually, you can.
Let’s circle back to the inciting incident. I don’t sweat the exact location of the inciting incident, as long as it’s in the first several chapters. Remember that the inciting incident is not what makes your reader start caring about your story. The inciting incident usually comes much too late for that. Long before your reader reaches the inciting incident, she should already care about your story.
My thinking is that you want to start pulling your reader into your story with a strong first sentence.

 

  1. Followed by a strong first paragraph.
  2. Followed by a strong first page.
  3. Followed by a strong first scene.

 

If you do all that, then it really doesn’t matter when the inciting incident happens, because your reader already committed to the story from the very beginning. The inciting incident just gives your reader words to explain why she’s committed.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Tuesdays With Story
Fifth Tuesday stories
July 31, 2018

 

Writing challenge: Write a fake book blurb, a nice way to roast a fellow writer. Example: blurb Larry Sommers’ latest book, The Sommers’ System for Writing a Bestselling Novel in 30 Days.

200 words max.

Children’s Author Strikes Again

Lisa McDougal

Monsters in my Soup

By Millie Mader

Monkey-Man Publishing, 2013

220 pages

Retail: $8.49

Smell the soup and it’ll make you hungry. Eat the soup and it’ll make you a monster. Monsters in my Soup is a terrifying children tale about the perils of eating soup. This isn’t your grandma’s special chicken noodle soup. Also, this isn’t your grandma. When monsters invade the little town of Safe Haven, Connecticut, posing as grandmothers aiming to enslave children by feeding them their special soup. Can our heroes, Blake, Jake, and Cake, stop them in time before they get so hungry that they eat the soup?

Millie Mader is the author of the children’s books, Creatures in my Teachers and No Razzle in my Dazzle.

—Lisa McDougal, author, It’s a Crime not to Give a Child a Horse (more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
July 20, 2018

In 10 days

It’s Fifth Tuesday!

The Trivedis will host us at their home in Madison, about a five-minute drive from Barnes & Noble Westside.

Yes, it’s a potluck, so bring some great food to share. Vegetarian, please. No meat dishes allowed this time.

And we have a writing challenge: Write a fake book blurb, a nice way to roast a fellow writer. Example: blurb Larry Sommers’ latest book, The Sommers’ System for Writing a Bestselling Novel in 30 Days.

Maximum length: 200 words

Format for your page:
(Title of book)
(Author’s name)
(Publisher and publication date)
(Number of pages)
(Retail price of book)

(Your blurb)
(Your name and at least one writing credit)

When you have your mini-masterpiece finished, email it to Jerry Peterson by Sunday evening, July 29.

Start time for our Fifth Tuesday is our usual 7 p.m. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
February 1, 2018

 

And the winner is. . .

Tracey Gemmell!

Novelist Kelly Harms, our writing contest judge, selected Tracey’s “Slip That Collar” as the best of our Fifth Tuesday stories. Kelly extended honorable mentions to Mike Austin for his story, “Dog People,” and Larry Sommers for his story, “Fowl Fortune.”

Tracey wins a critique of the first 50 pages of her novel to be provided by Judge Kelly. She also gets the pot of entry fees with which to take Kelly to dinner. It’s there that the two will talk through Kelly’s critique. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
November 26, 2017

Tuesday evening at B&N  

Where were ye . . . home, ill or preparing for Thanksgiving company? Working late hours or traveling? Seven were at B&N, gathered around a lone table, helping their colleagues become better writers and better storytellers. Here’s some of what was said:

Larry Sommers (chapter 2, untitled novel) . . . Tracy and others cautioned about professorial overkill by my omniscient narrator. Jerry and Jack had some great observations about the operation of steamboats and the configuration of levees along the Mississippi in the 19th century. Mike was quite taken by the instrospective material in the back part of the chapter. There were some good ideas for wording as well. Thanks, everybody!

Tracey Gemmell (1-page synopsis, More or Less Annie) . . . General agreement that the new one-page (plus 27 words, according to Jack!) was a big improvement over the last version. There were some suggestions for rewording a couple of sections. Overall, the voice and tone were considered appropriate and more ‘Tracey-like’. No one was bothered by the removal of mention of several characters. Many thanks for all the help and a Happy Thanksgiving to all.

Mike Austin (chapters 22.2 and 23, Riding with the Reed Gang) . . .  I received a lot of encouraging feedback from everyone about “Reed Gang.” Some of the discussion revolved around the shifting POV that I’ve been using, and whether or not it’s working. There was also discussion about adding some humor. Jack suggested that instead of a pistol Edgar should just have a turnip in his pocket. “Hey Edgar! is that a turnip in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?” But seriously, yes, there could be some lightening up throughout. I appreciate all the comments. Thanks everyone! (more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
November 10, 2017

Tuesday evening at ye olde bookstore   

Thirteen writers gathered around one very small table at Barnes & Noble Westside to look at short stories, chapters, a synopsis, and a picture book. Here’s who was up and summaries of the comments they received: 

Millie Mader (short story rewrite, “Stone Cold Stripper”) . . .  I was quite severally critiqued, and will try hard to rewrite a lot of my short story. It’s loosely based on fact, but hard to get all the facts together in order. Will keep on trying—and thanks all.

Tracey Gemmell (synopsis, More or Less Annie) . . .  Two truths revealed last night: writing a synopsis is hard, and Tracey’s efforts so far are not cutting it. All present agreed the synopsis ‘sells’ the book so must include more color with a better representation of writing style and humor. Tracey’s current version tries to include too much plot while stripping the real interest. Larry produced a more intriguing version, but length is still an issue if it’s to be a one-pager. All suggestions much appreciated.

Katy Sullivan (picture book, Snowalicious) . . .  I shared a children’s book. Majority seemed to think I had a two books. We discussed the tensing, word choice and illustrations. Thanks for the feedback. 
(more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
November 1, 2017

Last night at Jack’s place  

Eight around the table, plus four stories, one poem, two soups, lotsa cheese, salad, wine, beer, but no John Schneller apple pie. John was away at a seminar for work.

The poem and stories are up on our Yahoo group – you can read them there – and soon they will be up on our TWS web page.

Our next Fifth Tuesday

Put it on your calendar now, January 30. Amber Boudreau will host us at her home. One caution, says Amber. She has both cats and kids, so if you have an allergy to either . . .

We do have a writing challenge: Animal stories!

Such a broad topic gives each of us a lot of latitude in selecting our subject and the viewpoint from which we want to write. Yes, it can be a dog story with a dog telling the story.

The usual limit, 500 words.

Who’s up next week  (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »