Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Peter Handke’

Writer’s Mail
Tuesdays with Story
December 26, 2014

“If a nation loses its storytellers, it loses its childhood.” —Peter Handke

Pat Edwards will be the January newsletter editor

Please send in your writing submissions a as an upload and as an email attachment

Who’s up next . . .
January 6: Alicia Connolly-Lohr (chapter 9, Coastie Girl), Andy Brown (chapter, The Last Library), Pat Edwards (poems), Kashmira Sheth & Amit Trivedi (chapter, novel), Bob Kralapp (???), and Jerry Peterson (chapter 5, Rooster’s Story).
January 20: Lisa McDougal (chapter, Tebow Family Secret), Amber Boudreau (???), Mike Rickey (poems), Kashmira Sheth & Amit Trivedi (chapter, novel), Alicia Connolly-Lohr (chapter 10, Coastie Girl), Millie Mader (chapter 60, Life on Hold), and Judith McNeil (???).

Great word . . .
Shaleionaire
n. A person who owns land that sits over a shale deposit and has become rich by leasing that land to a company that extracts natural gas from the shale.
Examples
Increased sales reflect spending by landowners with leasing bonuses — dubbed “shaleionaires” in the report — and out-of-state workers paying hotel and restaurant bills.
—Bob Downing, “Akron area starting to feel economic benefits of Ohio’s Utica drilling, study says,” Akron Beacon Journal, January 10, 2014

Stewart visited a “shaleionaire”, one of the local farmers who’ve hit the shale gas lottery, and then came back here for a primer on power-supply management and energy security.
—Tom Sutcliffe, “TV review: Horizon — Fracking: the New Energy Rush, BBC2,” The
Independent, June 20, 2013
Earliest
What’s brought about the change is that there’s a new, unconventional process for extracting natural gas from shale, a dense rock formation two miles undergound. And if you’re sitting on top of it, you may become a new American phenomenon: a shaleionaire.
—“Shaleionaires” (video), 60 Minutes, November 14, 2010 (more…)

Read Full Post »

Writer’s Mail
February 19, 2014

First and Third Meeting February 18, 2014 at Barnes and Noble

Cindi shares part of her novel North Road. Lisa notices there’s a lot of introspection, but she would like to learn more from the narrative and dialogue instead. Andy suggests changing the POV to first person. Pat liked the interplay between characters at the dinner scene but she agrees that she should get to the end faster. Millie thought some of the descriptions were beautiful. Overall, there’s a little too much telling and not enough showing. Jerry suggests cutting the last sentence.

Andy reads from two short stories. The first story; Millie and Lisa thought it was interesting. Lisa wonders if it should be longer. Pat asks a question about word choice. Ruth wonders why one character doesn’t have a bigger reaction to being slapped. Cindi wonders if the character can go without the slap and instead throw something to the ground. As for the second story; Lisa thinks there’s a section that could get cut right away. Pat wonders why the clone would be clothed. Jerry has a problem with the face of the clone. Pat wonders how the clone is able to speak at the end. John wonders if the first line could be skipped altogether.

Amit reads from an untitled work. Jerry and Pat wonder whose story it is. The first person we meet is not the main character, but his daughter and fiancée are. Pat thinks the garden scenes and the kitchen scenes were really well done and very descriptive of all five senses. (more…)

Read Full Post »